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Vine leaf roller

Vine leaf roller

Vine leaf roller is an insect that attacks vine, pear, hazel, chestnut, poplar, willow and other forest trees.

Scientific name: Byctiscus betulae
Greek name: Τσιγαρολόγος

Damage

Vine leaf roller attacks (eats) the buds (eyes) and tender vegetation during the April-May period, causing characteristic etching. Females lay eggs inside leaves that have previously been rolled up, creating narrow, cigarette-like pouches. On vines, female vine leaf roller wraps 1-2 leaves, on pear and poplar 4-5, and on other trees more. They then dig into the stalks so that the “cigarette” like leaves fall to the ground.

Enemy

Vine leaf roller has 1 generation per year. The adult has the characteristic shape of the wrigglers and is 4.5-7mm long. It winters as an adult on the ground in a nymph cell or under the bark of stumps. In spring (March-April) it becomes active and lay eggs on leaves, rolling up the stem like a “cigarette”. In each cigarette it deposits 5-6 eggs. After the eggs have hatched, the larvae emerge and complete their development in 20-25 days. They then fall to the ground where they pupate. Adulthood usually occurs in August and the adults remain on the ground or in various shelters until the following spring.

Treatment

It is treated by spraying with appropriate insecticides before the “cigarette” is formed. In small vineyards, early collection and burning of the “cigarettes” is recommended.

Source

www.bayercropscience.gr
Leaf-rolling weevils (Coleoptera: Attelabidae)
Byctiscus betulae – AGES
Byctiscus betulae (Linnaeus, 1758) vine leaf roller
Rhynchitidae

Tags: PEAR TREEPLANTS ENEMYVINEYARD

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